སློབ་སྟོན་ལྷན་ཚོགས།

Kyle K. Courtney

Kyle K. Courtney

Kyle K. Courtney is the Copyright Adivsor for Harvard University, working out of the Office for Scholarly Communication. He works closely with Harvard Library to establish a culture of shared understanding of copyright issues among Harvard staff, faculty, and students. His work at Harvard also includes a role as the copyright and information policy advisor for HarvardX/edX. His "Copyright First Responders" initiative was profiled in Library Journal in 2013, and he was named a National Academic Library Mover & Shaker in 2015. In 2014, he founded Fair Use Weekem>, now an international celebration sponsored annually by over 80 universities, libraries, and other institutions. He recently won a 2016 Knight Foundation Grant to develop technology for crowdsourcing copyright and fair use advice. He also currently teaches resarch sessions at Harvard Law School, training first year law students on the fundamentals of legal research in the Legal Research and Writing program. Before joining Harvard University, Kyle worked at Harvard Law School as the manager of Faculty Research and Scholarship.

Kyle K. Courtney

Leonard van der Kuijp

Leonard van der Kuijp

Leonard W.J. van der Kuijp is Professor of Tibetan and Himalayan Studies with the Department of South Asian Studies and with the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations of Harvard University. He chairs the Committee on Inner Asian and Altaic Studies of Harvard University. Professor van der Kuijp worked at the Nepal Research Center in Kathmandu, Nepal, at the Free University in Berlin, Germany, and at the University of Washington, Seattle, before joining the Harvard Faculty in July 1995.

His research focuses primarily on Indo-Tibetan Buddhism, Tibetan Buddhist intellectual history, and Tibetan-Mongol and Tibetan-Chinese relations. His writings can be gleaned at academia.edu.

Professor van der Kuijp received his M.A. from the University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada, and his PhD from Hamburg University, Germany. In 1993, he was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship and a 2016 Guggenheim Fellowship.

Leonard van der Kuijp

Shaoyong Ye

Shaoyong Ye

Associate Professor at Peking University's Department of South Asian Languages, Professor Ye is a noted Sanskrit scholar. His dissertation, "Mūlamadhyamakakārikā and Buddhapālita's Commentary: A Philological Study on the Basis of Newly Identified Sanskrit Manuscripts" won the award for the national top-100 excellent doctoral dissertations of China.

Shaoyong Ye

Vesna Wallace

Vesna Wallace

Vesna specializes in Indian Mahayana and Vajrayana Buddhism and Mongolian Buddhism. Currently, she is working on a critical edition of the first chapter of the Smrtyupasthana Sutra and is studying Buddhism and law in Mongolia. Her recent publications include The Kālacakratantra: The Chapter on Sādhana together with the Vimalaprabhā and The Body as a Text and the Text as the Body: A View from the Kālacakratantra's Perspective. In As Long as Space Endures: Essays on the Kālacakra Tantra in Honor of H. H. The Dalai Lama.

Vesna Wallace

Alex von Rospatt

Alex von Rospatt

Professor Alexander von Rospatt received his B.A. from the School of Oriental and African Studies (University of London) in 1985, and his M.A. (1988), Ph.D (1993) and Habilitation (2000) at the University of Hamburg. He specializes in the doctrinal history of Indian Buddhism, and in Newar Buddhism, the only Indic Mahayana tradition that continues to persist in its original South Asian setting (in the Kathmandu Valley) right to the present. His first book (Stuttgart, 1995) sets forth the development and early history of the Buddhist doctrine of momentariness, a doctrine that is of pivotal importance not only for the understanding of doctrinal Buddhism, but also because much of the debate between Buddhists and their Brahmanical opponents came to center on this issue. A new book manuscript deals with the periodic renovations of the Svayambhu Stupa of Kathmandu. Based on Newar manuscripts and several years of fieldwork in Nepal, he reconstructs the ritual history of these renovations and their social contexts. His current research project is on life cycle rituals of old age among the Newars. On the basis of texts and fieldwork he examines how these rites evolved differently in a Buddhist and Hindu Shaiva context.

Alex von Rospatt

Per K. Sørensen

Per K. Sørensen

Professor Per K. Sørensen received his BA and MA in Tibetology—as the first in Northern Europe—from University of Copenhagen in 1982. His PhD similarly was defended in Copenhagen, with the title Divinity Secularized: An Inquiry into the Nature and Form of the Songs Ascribed to the Sixth Dalai Lama (Wien 1990). Since 1994 he has been Professor of Central Asian Studies (Tibetology and Mongol Studies) at Leipzig University, Germany. He specialises in Tibetan and Himalayan history, literature and culture. Central to his research stands Tibetan medieval history. He is author and co-author of approximately 15 books and many articles. He has been involved in a number of prestigious projects in his field as well as editorial commitments. From 1995 until 2010, he headed a long-term Danish-funded twinning project at the National Library and Archives of Bhutan, conducted in collaboration with the Royal Library of Denmark. Bhutan, the last Mahayana Buddhist kingdom in the world, has enormous holdings of indigenous, largely Buddhist texts. This project registered and documented the Kingdom's collections. Recently, he was a participant in the Tibet Research Group on Tibetan Genealogies at the Wissenschaftskolleg Berlin (Institute for Advanced Study).

Per K. Sørensen

Peter Skilling

Peter Skilling

Peter Skilling is a Canadian citizen (born 1949). He has been a resident of Thailand for 30 years. He received a PhD with honors and a Habilitation in Paris (Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes). His main field of research is the archaeology, history, and literature of Buddhism in South and Southeast Asia. Other interests include the early history of Mahāyāna Buddhism, the Pali literature of Southeast Asia, and the history of the Buddhist order of nuns. He has traveled extensively in South and Southeast Asia, and has been a visiting professor at Harvard University (2000), Oxford University (2002), and the University of California at Berkeley (2005). At present he is Maître de Conférences at the École française d'Extrême-Orient (EFEO) and Head of the Buddhist Studies Group of the EFEO. He is also a special lecturer at Chulalongkorn University (Bangkok).

Peter's publications include numerous articles and several books, the most recent being Mahāsātras: Great Discourses of the Buddha (2 vols., Oxford, The Pali Text Society, 1994 and 1997) and the edited volume Wat Si Chum, Sukhothai: Art, Architecture and Inscriptions (River Books, Bangkok, 2008).

Peter Skilling

Jonathan Silk

Jonathan Silk

Silk (1960) studied East Asian Studies at Oberlin College in Ohio and subsequently Buddhist Studies at the University of Michigan. At the latter university he obtained his PhD in 1994 with the thesis: The Origins and Early History of the Mahāratnakūţa Tradition of Mahāyāna Buddhism, With a Study of the Ratnarāśisūtra and Related Materials.

During his studies, Silk spent several years in Japan supported by various grants. After his PhD, Silk became Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at the Grinnell College in Iowa and in 1995 at the Department of Comparative Religion of the Western Michigan University. Since 2002 he occupied the same position at the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). There, Silk has been director of the South & Southeast Asian Languages Program. Silk received several awards during and after his studies, and occupied a fellowship six times, the last one at Yale University.

Silk's scientific orientation on Buddhism is very broad, in time as well as geographically: his interest covers the oldest primary sources and the rise of Buddhist communities all over Asia, but he is equally interested in the contemporary transmission of Buddhism toward the West. Silk reads Classic Sanskrit, Pāli, Middle Indian, Classic Tibetan, Classic Chinese, Japanese, French and German. He is furthermore fluent in Japanese.

Jonathan Silk

Akira Saito

Akira Saito

During the 90s Saito worked on four Dunhuang manuscripts of the Bodhicaryāvatāra, showing how the early version that they contained differed quite radically from the familiar later version. In August of 2015, Professor Saito organized a workshop to discuss new developments in the field of Madhyamaka studies, entitled "International Workshop on Candrakīrti vs. Bhāviveka."

Akira Saito

Burkhard Quessel

Burkhard Quessel

Burkhard Quessel is the Curator of Tibetan Collections for the British Library. His research interests include: (1) History of Tibetan Literature from the 10th to 20th centuries. Buddhist Philosophy in Tibet (particularly Madhyamaka and Pramana), (2) Traditional Tibetan Medicine, and (3) History of printing in Central and Eastern Tibet. He is currently working on a catalogue of the Tibetan manuscripts and block prints at the British Library.

Burkhard Quessel

Kazunobu Matsuda

Kazunobu Matsuda

Kazunobu Matsuda is Professor at Faculty of Buddhist Studies, Bukkyo University, Kyoto, Japan. His research has been focused on Sanskrit and Tibetan texts of the Yogācāra school, including discoveries of Sanskrit manuscript fragments of Yogācāra treatises, such as the Viniścayasaṃgrahaṇī and Paryāyasaṃgrahaṇī sections of the Yogācārabhūmi. Besides his contribution to the field of Yogācāra, he is currently participating in the international research project of the Buddhist Sanskrit manuscripts from Afghanistan and Pakistan, including the Schoyen Collection, Norway.

Kazunobu Matsuda

Todd Lewis

Todd Lewis

Todd Lewis has taught at the College of the Holy Cross since 1990. In 1996, he was promoted to Associate Professor in the Department of Religious Studies and in 2003 was promoted to the rank of Professor.

He has also been a Research Associate in the Department of Sanskrit and Indian Studies at Harvard University since 1999.

Beginning with his scholarly training at Columbia University (where he earned his Ph.D. in Religion 1984), Professor Lewis' research and teaching has been interdisciplinary, linking anthropology, the history of religions, and Indology. His area of special expertise is Newar Buddhism and has written about Buddhist narratives and the role of merchants in Buddhist history. Professor Lewis is also one of the world's leading authorities on the religions of the mid-montane Himalayan region and the social history of Buddhism.

Todd Lewis

Youngjin Lee

Youngjin Lee

Youngjin Lee studied Indian philosophy at Dongguk University, South Korea and obtained a doctorate in Indian Buddhism at the same university in 2008. Subsequently, he went to Germany as a post-doctoral researcher to study Sanskrit manuscripts at the Universität Hamburg. After returning to Korea in 2011, he has participated in the Humanities Korea Project entitled "Inspection of the Cultural Processes of the formation, transformation, and reception of the classical Buddhist languages and their literature" for seven years. He is now an associate professor of the Geumgang Center for Buddhist Studies (GCBS) at Geumgang University, as well as the chief editor of the journal, Critical Review for Buddhist Studies, published by the GCBS.

Lee's research interests include Indian, Tibetan, and East Asian Buddhist philosophy (especially paid to how ideas have been transformed and received in different regions and different times) and Sanskrit manuscripts.

Recent publications include Critical Edition of the First Abhisamaya of the Commentary on the Prajñāpāramitā Sūtra in 25,000 Lines by Ārya-Vimuktiṣeṇa, based on Two Sanskrit Manuscripts preserved in Nepal and Tibet. Manuscripta Buddhica 3. Napoli: Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale".

He is currently editing the Cintāmayī Bhūmiḥ of the Yogācārabhūmi and translating it into Korean with other scholars, in a project supported by The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Grants for Critical Editions and Scholarly Translations.

Youngjin Lee

Harunaga Isaacson

Harunaga Isaacson

Harunaga Isaacson (1965) studied philosophy and Indology at the University of Groningen and obtained a doctorate in Sanskrit at Leiden University in 1995. Subsequently he held positions at Oxford University, Universität Hamburg, and the University of Pennsylvania, before becoming Professor of Classical Sanskrit at Universität Hamburg in 2006. His research interests include Indian philosophy, both Buddhist and non-Buddhist; tantric traditions, both Buddhist and non-Buddhist; and Sanskrit poetry, both Buddhist and non-Buddhist. Recent publications include The Sekanirdeśa of Maitreyanātha (Advayavajra) with the Sekanirdeśapañjikā of Rāmapāla: Critical Edition of the Sanskrit and Tibetan texts with English Translation and Reproductions of the MSS, Napoli: Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale", 2014, Manuscripta Buddhica 2 = Serie Orientale Roma CVII (with Francesco Sferra).

Harunaga Isaacson

Jens-Uwe Hartmann

Jens-Uwe Hartmann

Professor Hartmann is the Chair of Indology in the Department of Indiology and Iranian Studies at Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich. His research interests include Buddhist Sanskrit manuscripts from Central Asia and Afghanistan, canonical literature of Buddhism, current developments of Buddhism in Asia, and the reception of Buddhism in the West.

Jens-Uwe Hartmann

Jowita Kramer

Jowita Kramer's research interests include Indian and Tibetan Buddhist philosophy (with particular emphasis on the Yogācāra tradition), Sanskrit manuscripts, aspects of authorship and intertextuality in Buddhist commentarial literature as well as Tibetan biographies. She has held positions at the Universities of California (Berkeley), Oxford, Heidelberg and Göttingen in the past and is currently a research fellow at the University of Munich.

Jowita Kramer

Janet Gyatso

Janet Gyatso holds the Hershey Professorship in Buddhist Studies in the Divinity School at Harvard University. Before coming to Harvard, she taught for 14 years at Amherst College from 1987-2001. She has also served on the visiting faculties of State University of New York at Stony Brook, Wesleyan University, University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, and as Numata Professor at Harvard University's Center for the Study of World Religions.

Prof. Gyatso received her Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in the department of South and Southeast Languages and Literatures with a dissertation on Thangtong Gyalpo and the visionary tradition of Tibetan Buddhism. She has studied extensively with living exponents of the Tibetan tradition, including Thartse Shabdrung Rinpoche, Deshung Rinpoche, Kalu Rinpoche, Drubtob Rinpoche, and Khanpo Sherab Palden.

Her major monograph is Apparitions of the Self: the Secret Life of a Tibetan Visionary, about the autobiographies of the Dzogchen master Jigme Lingpa. She is co-editor with Hanna Havnevik of a collection entitled Women in Tibet (Columbia University Press). She also edited and contributed to a volume on memory in Buddhism, In the Mirror of Memory: Reflections on Mindfulness and Remembrance in Indian and Tibetan Buddhism (SUNY Press).

Prof. Gyatso was president of the International Association of Tibetan Studies (IATS) from 2000-2006, and is general secretary for the Americas of the International Association of Buddhist Studies (IABS). She is also co-chair of the Buddhist Studies section of the American Academy of Religion. She serves on the editorial board of both the Encyclopedia of Religion and the Journal of the American Academy of Religion. She is a member of the advisory board of the Rubin Museum of Art, member of the editorial board of the monographic series Buddhisms at University of California Press, and of Studies in Indian and Tibetan Buddhism of Wisdom Publications.

Her special interests center on distinctive forms of Tibetan religious culture. She has written on revelatory transmission, issues of authorship, autobiographical writing, and notions of experience in Tibetan traditions and on conceptions of sex and gender in Buddhist monastic law. She is currently working on a book on Tibetan medicine.

Janet Gyatso

Jake Dalton

Jacob Dalton, Associate Professor and Khyentse Foundation Distinguished Professor of Tibetan Buddhism, received his Ph.D. in Buddhist Studies from the University of Michigan in 2002. After working for three years (2002-05) as a researcher with the International Dunhuang Project at the British Library, he taught at Yale University (2005-2008) before moving to Berkeley. He works on Nyingma religious history, tantric ritual, early Tibetan paleography, and the Dunhuang manuscripts. He is the author of The Taming of the Demons: Violence and Liberation in Tibetan Buddhism (Yale University Press, 2011) and Through the Eyes of the Compendium of Intentions: The History of a Tibetan Ritual Tradition (Columbia University Press, under review), and co-author of Tibetan Tantric Manuscripts from Dunhuang: A Descriptive Catalogue of the Stein Collection at the British Library (Brill, 2006). He is currently working on a study of tantric ritual in the Dunhuang manuscripts.

Jake Dalton

Christoph Cueppers

Professor Cueppers is a Tibetan language specialist who has worked to locate and document the existence of hundreds of vulnerable texts over the course of his career. His research interests include Tibetan law and government, Tibetan History of the 17th century, and Tibetan language.

Christoph Cueppers

Cangioli K. Che

Cangioli Che started her career in public relations and publications in 1974 as a public relations officer with a nonprofit organization in Hong Kong. In 1980 she started her own company, Management Resources International, one of the first, and most successful, professional organizers in Hong Kong, hosting many international conferences and exhibitions in the Asia-Pacific region.

Cangioli moved to San Francisco in 1988 and became a student of Dzongsar Khyentse Rinpoche in 1994. She served as treasurer of Siddhartha's Intent Western Door from 1996 to 2001. She was a founding director of Khyentse Foundation, and has served as executive director since the inception of the Foundation in 2001.

Cangioli graduated with honors from the University of Hong Kong with a Bachelor of Arts degree in English Literature.

Khyentse Foundation is a nonprofit organization founded by Dzongsar Khyentse Rinpoche to establish a system of patronage to support institutions and individuals engaged in the study and practice of Buddha's vision of wisdom and compassion.

One of the priority activities of Khyentse Foundation is to support the preservation, translation, and distribution of Buddhist texts, and to make them easily available to all those who wish to study.

Khyentse Foundation wholeheartedly supports the work of Gene Smith and the BDRC.

Cangioli K. Che

Lokesh Chandra

Professor Chandra is a prominent scholar of the Vedic period, Buddhism, and the Indian arts. He is currently president of the Indian Council for Cultural Relations. Lokesh Chandra has studied many languages, including English, Hindi, Sanskrit, Bengali, Pali, Avesta, Old Persian, Japanese, Chinese, Tibetan, Malayalam, Mongolian, Indonesian, Greek, Latin, German, French, Tamil, Old Javanese, and Russian. He has to his credit over 360 works and text editions, including classics like his Tibetan-Sanskrit Dictionary, Materials for a History of Tibetan Literature, Buddhist Iconography of Tibet, and his Dictionary of Buddhist Art in about 20 volumes.

Lokesh Chandra

Stefan Baums

Stefan Baums teaches Sanskrit, Prakrit and Pali language and literature and Buddhist Studies at the Institute for Indology and Tibetology of the University of Munich and serves as lead researcher of the Buddhist Manuscripts from Gandhāra project at the Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities. Before joining the University of Munich, he held positions at the University of Copenhagen, the University of Washington, the University of California, Berkeley, and Leiden University. His areas of research include Buddhist philology and epigraphy, classical Sanskrit court literature, the development of Buddhist hermeneutics, and the description of Gāndhārī language and literature. His current work focuses on the decipherment and edition of four Gāndhārī manuscripts containing commentaries on early Buddhist verses and the Saṃgītisūtra and a study of the historical connections and exegetical principles of this group of texts. He is editor of the Dictionary of Gāndhārī and co‐editor of the Gandhāran Buddhist Texts series.

Stefan Baums

Shrikant Bahulkar

Shrikant Bahulkar is a leading Sanskrit scholar at the University of Pune. His research interests include the relationship of Vedism and Brahmanism in Buddhist literature and medical ritual in the Veda and Ayurveda. Additionally, he has recently lectured on "The Horse of Pedu and the Remedy for Removing Snake's Poison" and "Attempts towards Preservation and Revival of Atharvaveda."

Shrikant Bahulkar