Board of Directors

Daniel Aitken

Daniel Aitken

Position: Treasurer

Daniel is an experienced marketing professional with over a decade of insights gathered from corporate and consumer marketing executive roles working for multinationals such as Canon, and large financial firms such as Westpac. While pursuing his marketing career, Daniel continued to foster his life long interest in Tibetan Buddhism, the Tibetan language, and its literature. This has taken him across Australia, America, India, Nepal, and Tibet to pursue a deeper understanding of Buddhist theory and practice with masters from the living tradition. Daniel also reads Sanskrit and Tibetan and has a PhD in Buddhist Philosophy. He is currently a Publisher at Wisdom Publications.

Daniel Aitken

Treasurer
Marcus Bingenheimer

Marcus Bingenheimer

Marcus Bingenheimer is Associate Professor of Religious Studies at Temple University. He is a scholar of Buddhist Studies specializing in the history and literature of China and East Asia, often by using digital datasets and computational methods. He obtained an MA (Sinology) and Dr. phil (History of Religions) from Würzburg University and an MA (Communication Studies) from Nagoya University. His main research interests are the history of Buddhism in East Asia and early Buddhist sūtra literature. At Temple University he is also Academic Director of the Loretta C. Duckworth Scholars Studio where he helps to coordinate support for emerging digital scholarship technologies, such as Digital Humanities & Arts methods, 3D printing, or the use of VR-environments.

Marcus Bingenheimer

John Canti

John Canti

John Canti is Editorial Chair and Director of 84000, a global nonprofit organization dedicated to translating all of the Buddha’s words into modern languages, and to making them freely available to everyone, everywhere. Throughout his career, John has devoted himself to producing lucid, accurate translations of Buddhist texts and teachings for the benefit of all. He is a founding member of the Padmakara Translation Group, which has the principal aim of preserving and communicating major classic and contemporary Buddhist texts through translation into French, English, German and Spanish. John has completed two three-year retreats at Chanteloube, France (1980-1985, 1986-1989), and was awarded the 2016 Khyentse Fellowship. John joined the BDRC Board of Directors in 2017.

John Canti

Lauran Hartley

Lauran Hartley

Lauran Hartley (PhD, Indiana University) is Tibetan Studies Librarian for the C.V. Starr East Asian Library at Columbia University and occasionally serves as Adjunct Lecturer in Tibetan Literature for the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures. She has also taught courses on Tibetan literature and religion at Indiana and Rutgers universities. In addition to co-editing the book Modern Tibetan Literature and Social Change (Duke University Press, 2008) and serving as Inner Asian Book Review Editor for the Journal of Asian Studies, she has also published several literary translations and articles on Tibetan intellectual history and discourse from the eighteenth century to the present. Since joining Columbia full-time in 2007, and as co-founder of the Tibetan Resources Working Group, Lauran has worked especially to revise the Library of Congress Tibetan Romanization Table, assist in coordinating Tibetan Studies metadata practices, and initiate Tibetan archival and digital preservation projects. She also jointly serves the University of Toronto Libraries through a cooperative agreement.

Lauran Hartley

Huanhuan He

Huanhuan He

Zhejiang University
Professor He specializes in Buddhist Studies, Indian Philosophy, and Tibetan Studies. She recently completed a stay with Harvard-Yenching Institute from January 2014 to October 2014. Her recent publications include, A Study of the Madhyamakahṛdayakārikā and the Tarkajvālā 中观心论>及其古注<思择焰>研究, China Social Sciences Press 中国社会科学出版社, 2013, two volumes, 831 pages.

Huanhuan He

Lama Jabb (མདའ་ཚན་བླ་མ་སྐྱབས)

Lama Jabb (མདའ་ཚན་བླ་མ་སྐྱབས༏)

Lama Jabb was born and brought up in the Dhatsen tribe, a nomadic community in Northeastern Tibet. He studied in Tibet, India and the UK and received his D.Phil at the University of Oxford. He is currently a Supernumerary Fellow in Tibetan and Himalayan Studies and the Head of the Tibetan and Himalayan Studies Centre at Wolfson College, and Instructor in Tibetan at the Faculty of Oriental Studies, University of Oxford.

Lama Jabb’s research and writing centre on the interplay between the Tibetan literary text and oral traditions, literary criticism, translation theory and practice, and contemporary Tibet. He is the author of the book Oral and Literary Continuities in Modern Tibetan Literature: The Inescapable Nation (2015) and many articles including “The Wandering Voice of Tibet: Life and Songs of Dubhe” (2019).

Lama Jabb (མདའ་ཚན་བླ་མ་སྐྱབས༏)

Christian Lammerts

D. Christian Lammerts

D. Christian Lammerts is Professor of Buddhist and Southeast Asian Studies at Rutgers University. He received his Ph.D. in Asian Religions from Cornell University in 2010. His research interests include the History of Buddhism in pre- and early modern Burma and Southeast Asia; Buddhist law and legal culture; Pali and Burmese literature; manuscripts and epigraphy; dhammasattha; and nissaya. He acted as a Visiting Lecturer in the Department of Southeast Asian Literature at the National University of Singapore from 2011-2012. His book Buddhist Law in Burma: A History of Dhammasattha Texts and Jurisprudence, c. 1250–1850 C.E, was published by University of Hawai’i Press in 2018. Lammerts joined the BDRC Board of Directors in February of 2017, bringing his expertise in Southeast Asian Studies to our growing Board.

D. Christian Lammerts

Donald S. Lopez, Jr.

Donald S. Lopez, Jr. (PhD, University of Virginia) is the Arthur E. Link Distinguished University Professor of Buddhist and Tibetan Studies at the University of Michigan. He is the author, editor, or translator of a number of works, including Prisoners of Shangri-La, The Madman’s Middle Way, Buddhist Scriptures, and The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism (with Robert Buswell). In 2000 he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Donald S. Lopez, Jr.

Michele Martin

Michele Martin

Position: Clerk

In 1966 Michele received a Masters degree in Russian Area Studies and in 1970, an MPhil in Comparative Literature, both from Yale University. After founding and practicing at Jemez Bodhi Mandala Zen Center in New Mexico from 1974 to 1977, she moved to Kyoto, Japan where she studied at Otani University with Nagao Gadjin and Nishitani Keiji in the years from 1977 to 1979.

After working as an editor for many years, which included developing the Buddhist series at SUNY Press, she moved to Nepal in 1987 to study Buddhist philosophy and the Tibetan language. Over the years, she has edited many volumes on Buddhism and translated texts from Tibetan while teaching and acting as an oral translator. She is the author of Music in the Sky: The Life, Art, and Teaching of the Seventeenth Karmapa Ogyen Trinley Dorje and translator of the root text and general editor of A Song for the King: Saraha’s Mahamudra Meditation.

Michele’s interest in TBRC is multiple. Not connected with a university and often living in places where access to texts is difficult, she has turned to TBRC for copies of texts not available otherwise. She would like to see the number of texts within reach on the internet expanded and also especially values the database developed by Gene Smith.

As a translator, she wants to see a database of translations, both finished and in progress, as a key tool for those inside and outside academia. With TBRC’s texts and database, access to the field of Tibetan studies is opened out to meet the needs of lamas from all traditions, scholar practitioners, new students, and researchers from all over the world.

Michele Martin

Clerk
Andrew Quintman

Andrew Quintman

Position: President

Andrew Quintman is a scholar of Buddhist traditions in Tibet and the Himalaya, and Associate Professor in the Department of Religion at Wesleyan University. He writes, teaches, and lectures about Buddhist literature and history, sacred geography and pilgrimage, and visual cultures of the wider Himalaya. His work addresses the intersections of Buddhist literary production, circulation, and reception; the reciprocal influences of textual and visual narratives; and the formation of religious subjectivities and institutional identities. His book, The Yogin and the Madman: Reading the Biographical Corpus of Tibet’s Great Saint Milarepa (Columbia University Press 2014), won the American Academy of Religion’s 2014 Award for Excellence in the Study of Religion, the 2015 Heyman Prize for outstanding scholarship from Yale University, and received honorable mention for the 2016 E. Gene Smith Book Prize from the Association of Asian Studies. In 2010, his new English translation of The Life of Milarepa was published by Penguin Classics. He is currently writing a history of Drakar Taso Monastery that explores Buddhist religious and literary culture in the borderlands of Tibet and Nepal. He also co-directs a project on the Life of the Buddha through visual and literary materials associated with Tāranātha’s seventeenth-century Jonang Phuntsokling Monastery in western Tibet.

Andrew Quintman

President
James Robson

James Robson

James Robson is Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations at Harvard University. Robson received his Ph.D. in Buddhist Studies from Stanford University in 2002, after spending many years doing research in China, Taiwan, and Japan. He specializes in the history of medieval Chinese Buddhism and Daoism and is particularly interested in issues of sacred geography, local religious history, talismans, and Chan/Zen Buddhism.

Robson is the author of Power of Place: The Religious Landscape of the Southern Sacred Peak [Nanyue 南嶽] in Medieval China (Harvard, 2009), which was awarded the Stanislas Julien Prize for 2010 by the French Academy of Inscriptions and Belles-Lettres and the 2010 Toshihide Numata Book Prize in Buddhism. His publications also include “Signs of Power: Talismanic Writings in Chinese Buddhism” (History of Religions 48:2), “Faith in Museums: On the Confluence of Museums and Religious Sites in Asia” (PMLA, 2010), and “A Tang Dynasty Chan Mummy [roushen] and a Modern Case of Furta Sacra? Investigating the Contested Bones of Shitou Xiqian.”

Robson joined the BDRC Board of Directors in February of 2017; prior to joining the BDRC Board Directors, Robson served as a member of the BDRC Board of Advisors, providing guidance on the preservation of East Asian materials.

James Robson

Kurtis Schaeffer

Kurtis Schaeffer

Kurtis R. Schaeffer is the Frances Myers Ball Professor of Religion and the Chair of the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Virginia. He is a student of Buddhist history and culture, with a special interest in the spiritual literature of Tibet and the Himalayas. He is the author or editor of nine books, including the largest anthology of Tibetan literature in English and, most recently, a translation of the life of the Buddha. Schaeffer co-directs the half-century old Tibetan Buddhist studies graduate program at the University of Virginia and, with Martien Halvorson-Taylor, directs the Global Religion Lab at UVA.

Kurtis Schaeffer

Emeritus Members

Tudeng Nima Rinpoche

Tudeng Nima Rinpoche

Tudeng Nima Rinpoche (Alak Zenkar Rinpoche) was born in 1943 in Pal Lhakhang, Sichuan, China. He has made outstanding contributions to Tibetan culture and education and is renowned as one of the world’s leading Tibetan Buddhist scholars. For the past forty years Tudeng Nima Rinpoche sought out, preserved and published thousands of volumes of Nyingma, Sakya, Kagyu, Geluk, Jonang and Bon literature.

Since the inception of the Tibetan Buddhist Resource Center (TBRC) in 1999, Tudeng Nima Rinpoche has served as a board member.

Tudeng Nima Rinpoche

Tulku Thondup Rinpoche

Tulku Thondup Rinpoche

Tulku Thondup Rinpoche was born in Golok, Eastern Tibet. At the age of four he was recognized as the rebirth of a celebrated scholar and adept of the famed Dodrupchen Monastery in Golok.

Tulku Thondup Rinpoche is the author of over a dozen books and Presiding Officer of The Buddhayana Foundation: 204 Spring Street, Marion MA.

Tulku Thondup Rinpoche

Derek Kolleeny

Derek Kolleeny

Derek met Gene Smith in 1998 and they immediately became close friends and collaborators. Derek assisted Gene in creating the Tibetan Buddhist Resource Center and realizing Gene’s vision. Derek served as Founding Board Member and Treasurer from its inception in 1999 until 2014 when he was forced to resign temporarily for health reasons.

In 1982, Derek earned a B.A. degree in the Comparative Study of Religion from Harvard College with a focus on Buddhism, including the study of Sanskrit and Tibetan languages, primarily under the guidance of Prof. Masatoshi Nagatomi and including studies with Prof. Daniel Ingalls and Prof. Robert Thurman. In 1989, Derek earned an M.B.A. degree from Columbia University. He then served as CFO for various companies and not-for-profit organizations for about 25 years, specializing in financial management and strategic planning. He is now a consultant focusing in those two areas.

Derek was a student of the late Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche, a lineage holder of the Kagyu and Nyingma lineages and a leading force in the transmission of these traditional Buddhist lineages to the West. Derek also studied at Naropa University and worked with the Nalanda Translation Committee, founded by Chogyam Trungpa. In 2004, he founded and continues to lead Rime Shedra NYC, which is dedicated to the advanced study of the core classical practice and philosophical texts of the Indian and Tibetan Buddhist traditions and is modelled around the traditional Shedra curriculum. In 2009, he co-founded and continues to co-lead Westchester Buddhist Center, which is dedicated to preserving and making accessible the unique system of teachings and practices transmitted by Trungpa Rinpoche.

Derek Kolleeny

Patricia Gruber

Patricia Gruber

In 1982 Patricia earned a Masters Degree in Psychology from Antioch West University in San Francisco, followed by a two-year post master’s Certificate in Psychotherapy from the Psychotherapy Institute in Berkeley, Ca. She was in the private practice of psychotherapy until 1995 in the Bay area, serving also as the Clinical Director of an alcohol treatment service for drinking drivers, and Director of an MA level training program focused on alcohol counseling. She is a founding member of the Milton H. Erickson Institute of the Bay Area, which provides training and consultation to professionals and graduate students in mental health, medicine, nursing and social work. She is a licensed Marriage and Family Counselor. Currently consulting for Globalvest Mgmt. Co., St. Thomas, she also serves as President of the Peter Gruber Foundation, a US non-profit. With philanthropic activities in the Virgin Islands the Foundation also awards annual international prizes in the sciences: Cosmology, Genetics, Neuroscience, as well as Justice and Women’s Rights. She is a former Trustee and Secretary, Board of Trustees, Antilles School, St. Thomas, VI; currently an Advisory Council Member of the ABA Center for International Human Rights of the American Bar Association; and serves as a Governing Council Member of the International League for Human Rights at the UN. This is her first year as a board member of TBRC.

Patricia Gruber

Richard Lanier

Richard Lanier

Richard Lanier is president emeritus of the Asian Cultural Council and a founding trustee of the Trust for Mutual Understanding in New York.

After receiving his M.A. at New York University, he taught art history at the University of California in Santa Barbara and at Johns Hopkins University.

In 1972, he joined The JDR 3rd Fund, a foundation established by John D. Rockefeller 3rd to promote cultural exchange between Asia and the United States. In 1975, he was appointed director of the Fund and in 1980 became president of the Asian Cultural Council, a public foundation that continues the Fund’s Asian-American exchange program. The Council’s headquarters are in New York and has offices in Tokyo, Hong Kong, Taipei, and Manila. The Trust for Mutual Understanding is a foundation that supports cultural and environmental exchanges between the United States, Russia, and other countries in Eastern and Central Europe.

Lanier is on the boards of the Rubin Museum of Art, the Japan Society, and the Salisbury Forum and is also a member of the Asian Art Advisory Committee at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. During the Clinton and Bush administrations, he was a member of the President’s Cultural Property Advisory Committee.

Richard Lanier

David Lunsford

David Lunsford

David Lunsford is the founder and executive director of the Bodhi Foundation, a private non-profit foundation dedicated to assembling conditions that benefit beings.

David received training in computer engineering and advanced technology from the University of Texas at Austin in the early 1980s. He then spent 18 years in the personal computer industry. Many of those years were spent at Dell Computer leading various engineering, and advanced technology teams.

Joining the TBRC board in 1999, David believed in the usefulness of applying emerging imaging, communications, and network technologies to the preservation and cataloging of the profound Tibetan traditions. Organizing and cataloging this library through Gene Smith’s profound understanding of literary relationships and contexts was a perfect application. Vast storage, databases, and networks now allow the Buddhist Digital Resource Center to present these rare and valuable resources in new ways. It is David’s wish you will join us, through sponsorship and support of this incredible center of knowledge and access.

May all beings benefit.

David Lunsford

Timothy J. McNeill

Timothy J. McNeill

Timothy J. McNeill has been president, CEO, and publisher of Wisdom Publications, a leading non-profit publisher of books focusing on Buddhism, since 1988. Mr. McNeill earned a Masters in Public Policy (MPP) degree from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University in 1979 after serving three years in the Peace Corps in Afghanistan.

From 1983 to 1986 Mr. McNeill was Vice President of Corporate Development for International Data Group, the world’s largest provider of information about information technology. From 1978-1983, he worked with Arthur D. Little, Inc in international development planning. Immediately prior to coming to Wisdom Publications he was Associate Issues Director for the Dukakis Presidential Campaign.

Currently, Mr. McNeill also serves on the board of the Barre Center for Buddhist Studies in Massachusetts. Mr. McNeill’s work at Wisdom reflects his longstanding commitment to the survival and propagation of Buddhist literature and culture through publication. He sees BDRC as an integral part of a greater vision of the development of quality translations of Buddhist books.

Timothy J. McNeill

Shelley F. Rubin

Shelley F. Rubin

Shelley Rubin is Co-Founder and Co-Chair of the Board of RMA (Rubin Museum of Art) which opened October, 2004. RMA, a museum dedicated to the art of the Himalayas, is located in the Chelsea neighborhood of New York. The dream to found a museum grew out of Shelley’s and her husband Donald’s desire to share their art collection with the public and the belief that its study would offer a powerful means of revealing universal truths of shared human experience.

Prior to building the museum Mrs. Rubin, together with her husband, started a foundation with the aim of supporting innovative efforts to transform society’s institutions and make them more responsible, while at the same time empowering individuals to develop their full potential. One of the first projects of the Foundation was the creation of Himalayan Art Resources, a website designed to catalog and to exhibit on line Himalayan art from collections around the world. This site is now a comprehensive and definitive archive encompassing the art of the entire Himalayan region.

Mrs. Rubin is a member of the Board of Trustees of the Educational Broadcasting Corporation (Thirteen/WNET, WLIW21, HD, Kids, World, and Create), the largest producer of cultural and arts programming in America. She also serves on the Board of Human Rights Watch (HRW), and formerly served on the Board of Trustees of the Interfaith Center of New York. She is a member of the Global Philanthropists Circle (GPC) and the Wealth and Giving Forum.

Shelley F. Rubin

Gray Tuttle

Gray Tuttle

Gray Tuttle is presently the Leila Hadley Luce Professor of Modern Tibetan Studies in Columbia University’s department of East Asian Languages and Cultures. He studies the history of twentieth century Sino-Tibetan relations as well as Tibet’s relations with the China-based Manchu Qing empire. The role of Tibetan Buddhism in these historical relations is central to all his research.

For the modern period, in his Tibetan Buddhists in the Making of Modern China (Columbia UP, 2005), he examines the failure of nationalism and race-based ideology to maintain the territory of the former Qing empire as integral to the Chinese nation-state. Instead, a new sense of Pan-Asian Buddhism was critical to Chinese efforts to hold on to Tibetan regions (one quarter of China’s current territory).

His current research project focuses on the support that Tibetan Buddhist institutions in Amdo have received from the both Central Tibet and China from the seventeenth to the twentieth century and how this support, along with economic growth in the Sino-Tibetan borderlands, has fueled expansion and renewal of these institutions into the contemporary period.

He is Co-Editor of The Tibetan History Reader and Sources of Tibetan Tradition, both published by Columbia University Press in 2013. In 2004-2005, he was a postdoctoral associate of Yale University’s Council on East Asian Studies and lecturer in the Department of History. He received his PhD in Inner Asian Studies at Harvard University in 2002.

Gray Tuttle